About me

I am Ondine Smulders and I have a breadth of experience in the working world. I am a coach and qualified psychotherapist and have a business background in investment banking. I also worked in political & economic journalism/publishing. My involvement in business continues to this day through a non-executive Director role at an international energy services firm.

My career and board position, together with my work in the NHS, have allowed me to develop a unique insight in the development of others in corporate settings.

My coaching work combines my knowledge and understanding of the banking and corporate sectors, with my training and practice in the clinical sector. I encourage people to gain a broader perspective on their lives and work with them to optimise their understanding of themselves and their abilities.

Ondine Smulders - Coaching seventeen

Career Highlights

  • 13 years in Investment Banking including roles as Head of Equities Research & Portfolio Risk Strategist
  • 13 years as Senior Economist & Political Analyst at the Economist Newspaper Group
  • 10 years as an Existential Psychotherapist and Clinical Supervisor
  • 5 years as Non-Executive Director of an international energy services company
  • 5 years as the Book Review Editor for Journal of Existential Analysis

Qualifications/Accreditations

  • Diploma Transformative Coaching (Animas, ICF accr, 2022)
  • Certificate Existential Coaching (SEA)
  • PgCert Supervision (Relational Change, London)
  • Certificate Group Facilitation (Gestalt Centre, London)
  • Accredited member of the UK Council for Psychotherapy (UKCP)
  • Member of the Society for Existential Analysis (SEA)
  • Advanced Diploma in Existential Psychotherapy (Regent University, London)
  • PgDip Psychotherapy & Counselling Psychology (Regent University, London)
  • MA Latin American politics and Economics (Institute of Latin American Studies, London)
  • MSc Finance & Accounting (London School of Economics)
  • BA International Business Administration (American University in Paris)

To dare is to lose one’s footing momentarily. Not to dare is to lose oneself (Kierkegaard)